Tag Archives | Electronics
Breakthrough in Flexible Electronics

Breakthrough in Flexible Electronics

A research team led by Prof. Keon Jae Lee of KAIST provides an easier methodology to realize high performance flexible electronics by using the Inorganic-based Laser Lift-off (ILLO), which enables nanoscale processes for high density flexible devices and high temperature processes that were previously difficult to achieve on plastic substrates.   Flexible electronics have been [...]

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Telecommunications: New Radio Wave Device

Telecommunications: New Radio Wave Device

Researchers at the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have achieved a milestone in modern wireless and cellular telecommunications, creating a radically smaller, more efficient radio wave circulator that could be used in cellphones and other wireless devices, as reported in the latest issue of Nature Physics.   The new [...]

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World Record in Data Transmission With Smart Circuits

World Record in Data Transmission With Smart Circuits

Fewer cords, smaller antennas and quicker video transmission. This may be the result of a new type of microwave circuit that was designed at Chalmers University of Technology. The research team behind the circuits currently holds an attention-grabbing record. Tomorrow the results will be presented at a conference in San Diego.   Every time we [...]

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Circuits That Melt Away When You’re Done

Circuits That Melt Away When You’re Done

Electronic devices that dissolve completely in water, leaving behind only harmless end products, are part of a rapidly emerging class of technology pioneered by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Early results demonstrate the entire complement of building blocks for integrated circuits, along with various sensors and actuators with relevance to clinical medicine, [...]

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Prolonged Power in Mobile Devices

Prolonged Power in Mobile Devices

Researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas have created technology that could be the first step toward wearable computers with self-contained power sources or, more immediately, a smartphone that doesn’t die after a few hours of heavy use.   This technology, published online in Nature Communications, taps into the power of a single electron [...]

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Future Flexible Electronics Based on Carbon Nanotubes

Future Flexible Electronics Based on Carbon Nanotubes

Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin and Northwestern University have demonstrated a new method to improve the reliability and performance of transistors and circuits based on carbon nanotubes (CNT), a semiconductor material that has long been considered by scientists as one of the most promising successors to silicon for smaller, faster and cheaper [...]

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Quick-Change Materials Break Silicon Speed Limit for Computers

Quick-Change Materials Break Silicon Speed Limit for Computers

Faster, smaller, greener computers, capable of processing information up to 1,000 times faster than currently available models, could be made possible by replacing silicon with materials that can switch back and forth between different electrical states.   The present size and speed limitations of computer processors and memory could be overcome by replacing silicon with [...]

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Beyond Silicon: Next Generation Electronic Device

Beyond Silicon: Next Generation Electronic Device

In the consumer electronics industry, the mantra for innovation is higher device performance/less power. Arun Thathachary, a Ph.D. student in Penn State’s Electrical Engineering Department, spends his days and sometimes nights in the cleanroom of the Materials Research Institute’s Nanofabrication Laboratory trying to make innovative transistor devices out of materials other than the standard semiconductor [...]

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Mystery of the Printed Diode Solved

Mystery of the Printed Diode Solved

For thirteen years the mystery has remained unsolved, but now Negar Sani, PhD student at Linköping University’s Laboratory of Organic Electronics, has succeeded in explaining how a printed diode can function in the GHz band. The diode forms the missing link between mobile phones and printed labels. With an article published in the Proceedings of [...]

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Move Over, Silicon: A New Circuit in Town

Move Over, Silicon: A New Circuit in Town

When it comes to electronics, silicon will now have to share the spotlight. In a paper recently published in Nature Communications, researchers from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering describe how they have overcome a major issue in carbon nanotube technology by developing a flexible, energy-efficient hybrid circuit combining carbon nanotube thin film transistors with [...]

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