Tag Archives | Artificial Intelligence
Mobile Robots Support Airplane Manufacturers

Mobile Robots Support Airplane Manufacturers

The robots move at walking speed along airplane components; in doing so, it applies a sealant against corrosion in equal measure. The mobile assistant is surrounded by technical workers who install, drill, and test. Admittedly this scenario is still a glimpse of the future — but in just a few years, it should be reality [...]

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Mobile Device Can Sense a Stranger’s Touch

Mobile Device Can Sense a Stranger’s Touch

Passwords, gestures and fingerprint scans are all helpful ways to keep a thief from unlocking and using a cell phone or tablet. Cybersecurity researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology have gone a step further. They’ve developed a new security system that continuously monitors how a user taps and swipes a mobile device. If the [...]

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Computers Teach Each Other Pac-Man

Computers Teach Each Other Pac-Man

Researchers in Washington State University’s School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science have developed a method to allow a computer to give advice and teach skills to another computer in a way that mimics how a real teacher and student might interact.   The paper by Matthew E. Taylor, WSU’s Allred Distinguished Professor in Artificial [...]

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Robotic Arm Probes Chemistry of 3-D Objects

Robotic Arm Probes Chemistry of 3-D Objects

When life on Earth was first getting started, simple molecules bonded together into the precursors of modern genetic material. A catalyst would have been needed, but enzymes had not yet evolved. One theory is that the catalytic minerals on a meteorite’s surface could have jump-started life’s first chemical reactions. But scientists need a way to [...]

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Complex Systems May Be Highly Controllable

Complex Systems May Be Highly Controllable

We don’t often think of them in these terms, but our brains, global financial markets and groups of friends are all examples of different kinds of complex networks or systems. And unlike the kind of system that exists in your car that has been intentionally engineered for humans to use, these systems are convoluted and [...]

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Forest Corridors Help Plants Disperse Their Seeds

Forest Corridors Help Plants Disperse Their Seeds

A forest in South Carolina, a supercomputer in Ohio and some glow-in-the-dark yarn have helped a team of field ecologists conclude that woodland corridors connecting patches of endangered plants not only increase dispersal of seeds from one patch to another, but also create wind conditions that can spread the seeds for much longer distances.   [...]

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Graphene-Metal Sandwich Shrinks Electronics

Graphene-Metal Sandwich Shrinks Electronics

Researchers have discovered that creating a graphene-copper-graphene “sandwich” strongly enhances the heat conducting properties of copper, a discovery that could further help in the downscaling of electronics.   The work was led by Alexander A. Balandin, a professor of electrical engineering at the Bourns College of Engineering at the University of California, Riverside and Konstantin [...]

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Acoustic Cloaking Device Hides Objects from Sound

Acoustic Cloaking Device Hides Objects from Sound

Using little more than a few perforated sheets of plastic and a staggering amount of number crunching, Duke engineers have demonstrated the world’s first three-dimensional acoustic cloak. The new device reroutes sound waves to create the impression that both the cloak and anything beneath it are not there.   The acoustic cloaking device works in [...]

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Finding Software Errors Via Genetic Algorithms

Finding Software Errors Via Genetic Algorithms

According to a current study from the University of Cambridge, software developers are spending about the half of their time on detecting errors and resolving them. Projected onto the global software industry, according to the study, this would amount to a bill of about 312 billion US dollars every year. “Of course, automated testing is [...]

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Auto-Fill for Gaps in Computer Programmers’ Code

Auto-Fill for Gaps in Computer Programmers’ Code

Since he was a graduate student, Armando Solar-Lezama, an associate professor in MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, has been working on a programming language called Sketch, which allows programmers to simply omit some of the computational details of their code. Sketch then automatically fills in the gaps.   If it’s fleshed out [...]

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